Lots of Twitterfolk Suffer From RSI

A quick sampling of messages on Twitter provides a revealing look at how many people are really experiencing RSI-related problems:

  • I think I’m getting carpal tunnel from writing so much” – CingleShaker
  • making coffee is hard when you can’t feel your hands. damn carpal tunnel. my hands are cashed this morning.” – bbyrd
  • I hope I don’t end up having wear some sort of stupid brace for carpal tunnel, my hand is killing me.” – nahun
  • trying to edit through the carpal tunnel pain.” – karenlisa
  • making the conscious effort to do everything with my left hand now because i’m starting to wonder if i have RSI or something worse” – skinnylatte
  • Attempting to mouse left-handed. Getting RSI-like pains in my forearm.” – drewm
  • in what seems to me an injustice, after reading last night instead of computing, my mouse claw (right hand RSI) is worse than in months” – scilib
  • Just been to docs. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome it is then. Does that mean I should stop using computers? ” – niallcook
  • Seriously feeling exhausted. My carpal tunnel is so bad today. I feel the ache all the way up my arm and my hands are tingling. Not good.” – DeaEterna
  • After successfully dodging carpal tunnel.syndrome for years, it burns my buns to have been hit by plantar fasciitis. And I did it to myself.” – gregortroll
  • I changed my knitting style to limit the dequervain’s syndrome in my right hand, but the new style is causing carpal tunnel in my left. 🙁” – jesh

Of course, most people refer to any sort of arm/hand/wrist pain as “carpal tunnel”, but still, there are a lot of people hurting out there…

If you haven’t done so yet, please follow RSI-Relief on Twitter for the latest RSI news and links.

Randy Rasa

Randy is an engineer/programmer/web designer who has suffered from repetitive strain injury off and on for over a decade.

2 Comments:

  1. Carpal tunnel syndrome involves a compressed median nerve at the wrist that leads to pain and muscle weakness in the hand. The problem happens because the carpal tunnel is so tightly bound that it has no place to expand if overuse and inflammation occur. At first, anti-inflammatory drugs and splints can help. More advanced cases may require surgery.Visit the site below to know more click here, read more about Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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